Upcoming event: Showcasing Excellence and Innovation in Teaching Criminology and Criminal Justice – 16th January 2019

Showcasing Excellence and Innovation in Teaching Criminology and Criminal Justice

The Centre for Research and Innovation in Legal Education (CIRLE) is proud to be hosting the 2018 annual conference of the British Society of Criminology’s Learning and Teaching Network.

The Centre for Research and Innovation in Legal Education (CIRLE) is proud to be hosting the 2019 annual conference of the British Society of Criminology’s Learning and Teaching Network. This one day event will bring together leading innovators in criminology and criminal justice education to showcase best practice in higher education. The aim of the day is to discuss what innovation in criminal justice looks like, why such programmes are successful and what impact they have on the students. The day will consist of papers from across the discipline from people who have either been nominated or won the BSC Learning and Teaching Prize. The event will draw to a close with a keynote from Professor Stephen Case who will discuss the future direction of learning and teaching in criminology and criminal justice in the UK.

Programme

Details of the programme will be confirmed shortly before the event. In the meantime, we are delighted to welcome the below confirmed speakers:

  • Professor Chris Birkbeck and Dr Muzammil Quraishi – University of Salford
  • Dr Alexandria Bradley and Dr Sarah Goodwin– Sheffield Hallam University
  • Dr Gill Brown – University of Bolton
  • Professor Stephen Case – Loughborough University
  • Dr Hannah King, Professor Fiona Measham, Dr Kate O’Brien – University of Durham
  • David Manlow – University of Westminster
  • Dr Helen Nichols and Dr Serena Wright – University of Lincoln and Royal Holloway
  • Kate Strudwick – University of Lincoln

Alongside a wide variety of papers, there will be opportunities for informal networking during and after the conference.

Please register here for the conference.

Location Details

Moot Court,
School of Law
Liberty Building
University of Leeds
LS2 9JT

For sat navs, please use the postcode for Moorland Road, LS6 1AN.

The Liberty Building can also be found on the campus map.

All welcome. This is a free event, though registration is required.

The information you provide will be held by the School of Law, University of Leeds in accordance with the University’s Data Protection Policy. We will use this information to provide you with updates relating to the event you have registered to attend and may contact you following the event to request feedback (feedback is optional). Information will be retained until the event has passed, unless you request to be kept informed about future events from us.

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Bringing Learning and Teaching to the Forefront of British Criminology by Dr. Suzanne Young

This year’s British Society of Criminology conference included two separate panels on learning and teaching that aimed to open up discussions on how we deliver teaching and learning and showcase innovate practices. Whilst it was great to see more learning and teaching being incorporated into this year’s conference, research papers still very much dominated the focus of the event. Following on from the conference, this blog hopes to open up wider discussion on why learning and teaching should be brought to the forefront of Criminology in the UK and ways in which it can be achieved.

By in large, learning and teaching is only a small focus for British Criminology. The BSC learning and teaching networkhas just over 20 members even though criminology is being taught in over 700 higher education courses in the UK (as either single or joint honours). The number of students choosing to study Criminology continues to grow and this has led to a growth in staff required to deliver the courses. Even with the popularity of the discipline and the increase in Criminology teaching posts, learning and teaching is very much separated from criminological research and this can be witnessed in a number of different ways. There is a distinct lack of research and writing that focuses on teaching Criminology, scholarship of this kind is largely confined to departments or schools and used to improve or reflect on individual courses. So, there may be some great work innovative Criminology and Criminal Justice courses, but we rarely hear about it. The BSC National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology and Criminal Justice, sponsored by Sage, has been a great way to celebrate excellence in Criminology, but each year it is surprising how few nominations are submitted, particularly given the size of the discipline.

Despite efforts of the BSC Learning and Teaching Network who host events nationwide, it is only a small number of academics who attend and contribute to these events. The presence of learning and teaching scholarship at regional and national criminology conferences and events is minimal in comparison to those on research and criminal justice policy and practice. Another problem is that for people who do undertake research specifically on Criminology teaching and learning, it can be very difficult to find the right outlet for publishing. Most social science teaching and learning journals are American based, such as the Sage Teaching Sociology Journal, the Journal of Criminal Justice Education or the Journal of Political Science Education.  Undertaking a quick search through the British Journal of Criminology and Crime and Criminal Justice journal highlights that neither have any articles on teaching and learning. This results in generic HE journals becoming the main outlet for research findings, which often do not reach the audience of the discipline. This all indicates that teaching and learning are not at the forefront of British Criminology despite the growth in the number of institutions offering courses and the number of people teaching the discipline. In North America we see a different approach whereby they have a dedicated journal and the annual American Society of Criminology conference has an abundance of sessions discussing teaching and learning.

I suggest that learning and teaching is more important now than it has ever been given the current climate on higher education in Britain. The majority of academic staff spend a large proportion of their time on teaching and learning activities. For instance the 2016 UCU workload surveyshows that those on teaching and research contracts spent double amount of their time on teaching than research. The 2017 Times Higher Education teaching surveyfound that more than half of academics surveyed spend much more time on teaching related activities than admin or research. Given the amount of time and resources spent on teaching and learning within the discipline, it is questionable why we do not have wider discussions around how that teaching and assessment is undertaken and what is deemed to be effective teaching and learning in criminology. There are increasing debates  around the research and teaching relationship, for instance the Times Higher Education recently published an article entitled Are teaching and research mutually exclusive?Pedagogical expertise is just as important as research expertise, but continues to be deemed less valuable in many cases.

The next important reason for a greater focus on teaching and learning is the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).  The teaching excellence framework is currently being piloted at subject, rather than institutional, level. This means that subject areas are going to be measured and judged on their teaching and learning and will likely involve showcasing teaching and learning impact case studies and examples of best practice. Given it is still in the pilot phase and going through consultation, we don’t fully know what it will look like. However, from 2019/20, TEF will be assessed at subject and institutional levels. The 3 main metrics used (again these may change for subject level) are the learning environment, the NSS and student outcomes (i.e. where students go after graduating). Thus, there are implications here for Criminology and we need to consider how to address these should our institutions take part in TEF. In addition, the 2021 Research Excellence Framework (REF) is accepting subject specific pedagogical outputs and case studies that demonstrate impact on teaching, thus subject level learning and teaching is gaining recognition within both excellence frameworks.

A further important reason to put teaching and learning at the forefront of British criminology is the new office for students, which came into effect this year. Their regulatory framework is designed to protect students by ensuring they are getting value for money and receive a high quality academic experience. This means that courses ought to consider whatis taught in criminology and criminal justice and howit is taught and assessed. Although Criminology is often taught in combination with other disciplines (i.e. law, sociology, social policy, psychology), when it comes to the university subject league tables it stands as its own discipline. This means that as a subject it is being judged and measured on the quality of the course, progression, outcomes and employability.

Taking all these together, I believe that we need to be putting a greater focus on teaching and learning in Criminology. We need to talk about it more widely, we should be sharing practice, undertaking scholarly pedagogical research, and treating it as equally important as our research projects. There are some small steps that could be taken such as including more criminology and criminal justice pedagogy research in the mainstream criminology journals and having more teaching and learning presence at regional and national events. As a member of the BSC Learning and Teaching network, I hope that the excellent criminology learning and teaching that occurs across UK universities becomes more widely recognised and celebrated.

 

Blog post- ‘criminology in a chaotic world’ Reflections from the event. By Kate Strudwick and Natacha Harding

‘Criminology in a chaotic world’- debate and discussions can share good practice!

 

Criminology in a chaotic world – 3rd May The University of Winchester

The timing of this one day teaching and learning symposium was very pertinent given the challenges we all face in the current chaotic time of teaching and research in Criminology. Through a selection of presented papers and interactive workshop the discussions brought together shared experiences on the challenges of teaching topics such as miscarriages of justice, hate crime, terrorism and incorporating theory into your teaching.

Starting with an enthusiastic welcome from Dr Angus Paddison, Dean of Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, the symposium was opened with a presentation by Dr Jill Dealey on teaching miscarriages of justice to a multi disciplinary cohort of Undergraduate students. Drawing on experiences of applying live case work in partnerships with Inside Justice, Proof magazine and Justice Gap website the module demonstrated an excellent example of partnerships working in practice. The positives learnt from co-ordinating the module identified the many rewarding aspects of it, both from student perspective and as a tutor. Looking to future plans for peer assisted learning within this module, such as possible experiences that could be learnt from Crime Live events and ‘Inside justice’, by putting the ‘public’ into Criminology practice for public audiences investigating MOJ were also discussed.

The following paper By Dr Matt Clement discussed his experiences of using databases to teach undergraduates definitions of radicalization, hate crimes and terrorism, by applying the work of Hamm and Spaaij database/ work. Drawing on his experiences of how to tackle teaching the myths around terrorism, understandings could be learnt through database evaluations. The module demonstrated how students can become researchers using the media as a formula.

The final paper in session one by Dr Aaron Pycroft tackled the trials of teaching complexity theory to undergraduates. Discussing how this called for more creativity in thinking about criminological theory, via virtual and actual revisiting of theories towards ethics of justice. Concluding that links needed to be fully understood to allow such innovations to be embedded in curriculum design. Arguing that there is a need to avoid polarisation and work towards breaking out of silos to present a new way of thinking about criminological issues.

Learning about the challenges of teaching new technologies Greta Squires and Dr Dan Burrows presented a workshop on blended learning. In their curriculum development review they explored how they have brought blended learning into practice through research enquiry led teaching on the criminology of warfare, gun crime, violence, criminology border and crimmigration. Presenting the case for blended learning they argued for the lecturers to be more actively engaged in their use of technology. Working through some of the practicalities that come with large cohorts, specific examples of using Nearpod, Kahoot, Poll everywhere and VR google were demonstrated to the participants. They addressed reflections from participants on how, as criminologists, we use blended learning to inform practice, and how such technologies can be a tool but also highlighted the importance of their suitability for specific modules.

Craig Webber presented his paper on managing student expectations by discussing the perceived problems with managing the tensions that come with NSS scores and co ordinating combined criminology and psychology programmes. Addressing the age old questions of ‘what is criminology’ and the complexities of such definitions,  the need to ‘Bridge that divide’ with relationships betweeb media/public/ the web/ academia were debated. Bringing in the TEF impact and the myriad of further challenges led to a critical and challenging discussion.

Nicola Cadet and Andrew Fowler presented their paper on rendezvous criminology through the gaze of simulation modules. The theme was on embedding employability into degree programmes through the ‘crim pal’ schemes, internships and practice on placements- effectively bringing the real world in. Applying Mezirow’s 10 stage process for transformative learning- questioned what students can do in placements and enabled the presenters to address some of the realities, but also highlight how placements can be empowering and challenge beliefs.

The final paper by Peter Squires and Hannah Thurston finished the symposium with a fitting exploration of ‘Transcending the criminological imagination’ though their cross cultural module.   The context setting of criminology as a discipline was an excellent way to being together some of the themes discussed earlier of research led/ research informed teaching within the threshold of criminology. The key to their paper was to emphasise the importance of looking ‘outside the box’ to move forward. Their cross cultural module used the cultural context to help students to understand global politics and crime, thus open their eyes to the globe! Such illustrations demonstrated how they were attempting to broaden the criminal justice box!

The final roundtable session again effectively brought together common themes and trends from the day. ‘How to prepare students in chaotic world?’ enabled participants to debate where criminology has changed, developed, the debates of what is perceived as core and why we attempt to ‘sugar the pill?’ The scope to be creative was seen as core to appreciating the criminology which exists in many institutions. External pressures, assessment models, employability and the impact of central control mechanisms ended the discursive symposium off suitably with participants leaving with perhaps more questions than answers, but importantly many new ideas to bring back to their own institutions and teaching teams ready for the approaching academic year.

 

 

Kate Strudwick and Natacha Harding

 

 

Criminology in a Chaotic World Symposium(British Society of Criminology L&T Network) 3rd May 2018- Extension to abstract deadline ( 16th March 2018)

British Society of Criminology Learning and Teaching Network

Call for Papers – One Day Symposium – “Criminology in a Chaotic World”

Venue: King Alfred Campus, University of Winchester, Sparkford Road, Winchester, SO22 4NR

Date: Thursday 3rd May 2018

Issues around crime and justice have a particular role to play in political dialogue in an era when the established global structure appears to be in turmoil and constant flux. The rise of nationalistic and increasingly protectionist politics across many countries have signalled a period of increasingly punitive approaches to crime and criminality. As we develop our students to potentially be the next generation of criminal justice employees, as educators are in a challenging position in delivering a curriculum that addresses such issues, targets misinformation head on and prepares our students for the chaotic world they will be working in all while acknowledging the increasing politically diverse student base.

This symposium aims to explore these challenges and the associated opportunities of teaching criminology in this climate. We encourage the sharing of best practice, exploring ideas and innovations taking place in criminology curriculum and discussing new ideas as part of the day.

We welcome abstracts on the following themes:

  • Student political diversity as a teaching tool
  • Diversity and difference in criminology
  • Global challenges, local teaching
  • Preparing students for an unknown post-graduation working world
  • Embedding chaos into teaching

Abstracts will be accepted in the following formats –

  • Single Paper Presentation
  • Panel Presentation (a set of 3 papers presented in either slots of 10 minutes, followed by 30 minutes discussion)
  • Other (please let us know if you would like to do something different)

Submission instructions

Please email your 300 word abstract submission as a word document to Natacha Harding (natacha.harding@winchester.ac.uk). In addition, please state the full names of all authors, the title of the paper, which theme the abstract is being submitted for consideration, and also which institution/organisation you are from.

There has been an extension to the deadline for the submission of abstracts for the day to Friday 16th March 2018.

Key Dates:

  • 14 December 2017 – Call for papers opens and booking opens
  • 30 March 2018 – All abstracts confirmed
  • 3 May 2018 – Symposium

Call for submissions to National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology 2018

The National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology 2018

This award is intended to highlight and celebrate outstanding practice/innovative teaching in Criminology across HEIs in the UK and it is supported by the British Society of Criminology, the HEA, and SAGE who sponsor the annual prize. Applications are welcomed from individuals or small clusters of teaching staff who can be early career or well as established academics and/or Criminology/Criminal Justice Teaching Teams.

Applicants can be self-nominated but nominations will also be accepted by academic colleagues for a learning and teaching practice they feel should be recognised. The criteria for nominations have been informed by the UK Professional Standards Framework for teaching and supporting learning.

The winner/s of the award will be announced and the prize presented at the annual BSC Conference. However, the BSC reserves the right not to award the prize in any given year if the submissions received do not clearly identify what it is that is particularly outstanding or innovative in the delivery of teaching and learning in the applicant’s Criminology and/or Criminal Justice Module/Programme. It should also be understood that this award is not to ratify or support the rigour of a Criminology/Criminal Justice Programme – that is already covered in-house by University Quality Assurance requirements and External Examination process. Programme applications are therefore discouraged and particular aspects of innovation within programmes encouraged. It is about identifying, acknowledging and disseminating ‘excellence’ in relation to learning and teaching; something that we can all learn from. Therefore, the focus of your applications should be clearly evidenced on specific practice.

Submissions

Each nomination must be accompanied by a covering letter, countersigned by the Head of Department/Head of Learning and Teaching (or equivalent), together with a short overview of no more than 2000 words explaining the learning experience and how this not only meets the UK Professional Standards Framework but why it is significant and how it represents excellence. Supporting evidence is also required and this can be in the form of statements from a colleague, peer review report, and if applicable student feedback/comments.

Application forms can be downloaded from the link below:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FqtDBOKFG_wngfw30TPp1UhmaJcDS3My91Jsy0K7K5U/edit?usp=sharing

In order to make the award available to those teaching criminology across the academy, eligibility for the award is not restricted to BSC members but nominations from non-members will have to be accompanied by a letter of support from a BSC member and the award winner will be encouraged to become a member prior to the presentation of the prize.

Entries should be submitted by 12th February 2018 to Suzanne.young@leedsbeckett.ac.uk and T.Miles-Berry@shu.ac.uk

Guideline criteria

The Awards Panel will require evidence that the applicant’s submission meets the QAA Criminology Benchmarks for Learning and Teaching and should therefore include at least one of the following areas:

  • The use of innovative teaching strategies to make a positive contribution to learning and teaching of criminology that is flexible and inclusive in mode of delivery
  • The clear demonstration of an approach that enhances the teaching and learning experience to that which would normally be expected
  • The incorporation of criminological research, scholarship and/or professional practice into teaching that is centred around skill building and self-development
  • The development of a teaching strategy to meet the needs of a diverse student population including diverse political, cultural and social contexts
  • Inclusive teaching practices which encourage collegiality and provide varied contexts for learning
  • Commitment to the development of autonomy and critical thinking skills in students within criminology
  • Teaching practice that is clearly grounded in the academic literature on pedagogy in HEIs.

The L&T Committee will determine the eligibility of submitted proposals, select a shortlist, which will then be passed to the judges who will decide the winning entry.

The award, sponsored by Sage, consists of £100, plus £100 worth of SAGE books. Winners of the award will be invited to write a full paper for future publication in the BSC Journal Criminology and Criminal Justice, which will be subject to the Journal’s normal editorial and peer review processes. The winner will also be invited to write a short article for the BSC and HEA newsletters.

The Awards Panel reserves the right not to make the award, in the event that the standard of submissions is not deemed sufficient

If you have any questions about the application, please get in touch with us.

 

Suzanne Young, Senior Lecturer in Criminology: Leeds Beckett University

Suzanne.young@lledsbeckett.ac.uk

 

Tanya Miles-Berry, Principal Lecturer in Criminology: Sheffield Hallam University

T.Miles-Berry@shu.ac.uk

 

Awards Panel

Stuart Agnew

Dr Linda Asquith

Liz Austen

Dr Martyn Chamberlain

Dr Michael Fiddler

Dr Liz Frondigoun

Dr Nic Groombridge

Natacha Harding

Dr Mathew Jones

Dr Phil Johnson

Debbie Jones

David Manlow

Ian Marder

Tanya Miles-Berry

Dr Andrew Newton

Dr Helen Nichols

David Patten

Katie Strudwick

Pamela Ugwudike

Angus MacCulloch

Henry Yeomans

Dr Suzanne Young

 

Judges

Professor John Craig, Leeds Beckett University

Professor Stephen Case, Loughborough University

Dr Mary Corcoran, Keele University

 

Sponsored by

 


HEA logoSAGE

Criminology in a Chaotic World Symposium(British Society of Criminology L&T Network) 3rd May 2018

British Society of Criminology Learning and Teaching Network

Call for Papers – One Day Symposium – “Criminology in a Chaotic World”

Venue: King Alfred Campus, University of Winchester, Sparkford Road, Winchester, SO22 4NR

Date: Thursday 3rd May 2018

Issues around crime and justice have a particular role to play in political dialogue in an era when the established global structure appears to be in turmoil and constant flux. The rise of nationalistic and increasingly protectionist politics across many countries have signalled a period of increasingly punitive approaches to crime and criminality. As we develop our students to potentially be the next generation of criminal justice employees, as educators are in a challenging position in delivering a curriculum that addresses such issues, targets misinformation head on and prepares our students for the chaotic world they will be working in all while acknowledging the increasing politically diverse student base.

This symposium aims to explore these challenges and the associated opportunities of teaching criminology in this climate. We encourage the sharing of best practice, exploring ideas and innovations taking place in criminology curriculum and discussing new ideas as part of the day.

We welcome abstracts on the following themes:

  • Student political diversity as a teaching tool
  • Diversity and difference in criminology
  • Global challenges, local teaching
  • Preparing students for an unknown post-graduation working world
  • Embedding chaos into teaching

Abstracts will be accepted in the following formats –

  • Single Paper Presentation
  • Panel Presentation (a set of 3 papers presented in either slots of 10 minutes, followed by 30 minutes discussion)
  • Other (please let us know if you would like to do something different)

Submission instructions

Please email your 300 word abstract submission as a word document to Natacha Harding (natacha.harding@winchester.ac.uk). In addition, please state the full names of all authors, the title of the paper, which theme the abstract is being submitted for consideration, and also which institution/organisation you are from.

Key Dates:

  • 14 December 2017 – Call for papers opens and booking opens
  • 2 March 2018 – Call for papers closes
  • 30 March 2018 – All abstracts confirmed
  • 3 May 2018 – Symposium

Booking Instructions

See attached the completed call for papers, set up as an event on Eventbrite (https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/criminology-in-a-chaotic-world-british-society-of-criminology-lt-network-tickets-41274359721)

Please do contact Natacha Harding (natacha.harding@winchester.ac.uk) with any specific requirements in terms of access or dietary needs.

The University of Winchester is easily accessible by direct trains from London Waterloo and is well served by cross country services. Winchester has four Park & Ride services and is easily accessed from the M3. Please find more information here on getting to the University of Winchester.

Key Dates:

  • 14 December 2017 – Call for papers opens and booking opens
  • 2 March 2018 – Call for papers closes
  • 30 March 2018 – All abstracts confirmed
  • 3 May 2018 – Symposium

 

Two way street of student feedback Natacha Harding Natacha.Harding@winchester.ac.uk

Module and programmatic feedback. NSS. League Tables. Internal surveys preparing for all these. It seems that every other day, there is some form of student experience survey or feedback being gathered and requiring an action plan in response. Whatever your methodological or pedagogical views on such processes, they are an inherent part of modern higher education. Having recently taken over a leadership role within the programme I work in, I am starting to realise just how many of these surveys and assessments exist. I have, of course, written the action plans. The team I work with and I welcome student feedback and appreciate the constructive and positive role it can play. However, there is no escaping the one sided nature of this. We, of course, give feedback in both formal and informal situations to our students on their learning. However, what seems to be missing is the student buy in to the changes that we make on the basis of their feedback concerning their experience.

A classic example of this is interaction. Repeatedly, there are calls for more interactive elements in teaching sessions. I have attended the seminars telling me that the didactic information dump lecture is dead. Our students learn best by doing and being involved in their learning – a sense of ownership and responsibility in their development. However, I am sure we can all share stories of the silent seminar. Of the wonderfully designed, fully interactive, all round teaching session that then goes flat through the lack of participation. We, as educators, are battling back against years of rote teaching in the pre-18 year old education system where our students have generally been passive actors in their learning. How do we undo 14 years of education in a timely manner that ensures we get students to make the most of the whole three years they are with us for their degree?

I am trying something a little different this year which I am sure is by no means new in other institutions. I have so far written at least four different action plans and interim responses. As a team, we have made agreements about working practises and have communicated these to our students regarding what they can expect in terms of contact, teaching and assessment and many other areas. However, in turn, I have set out a response of what we expect from our students having acted on their feedback. If they are asking for more interaction then they need to interact more. If they want more assignment guidance, they need to take responsibility for following that guidance and acting upon it through an independent process of learning and assessment.

The two way ‘agreement’ is written in a positive and constructive tone. A sort of ‘you said, we did, now you do’ approach. I co-created it with a group of 10 students who, I will admit, were already the more engaged students in our cohorts but they did represent the three years of the programme and a range of attitudes to teaching and learning. They understood the nature of the educational process at degree level being less of the educator telling them what they needed to know and, through some form of osmosis, they learned and that it was more about it being a dialogue, a partnership. The nature of that partnership shifts and changes over time. At times, we need to be in the ‘teacher’ role and they need to be the ‘student’ (setting standards etc.). Sometimes, we are closer to being working partners (interactive ideas, dissertation supervision for example). The key to this ‘agreement’ is that it allows everyone to know what everyone can expect and that it is not a ‘stick’ to metaphorically beat anyone with. We already have a Student Charter (which all universities do) but this document goes beyond that. It is a statement of intent, an agreement that if we listen and act, students need to listen and act too. They are part of the process and there is responsibility on their part for their own learning and development.

I have no idea how this will go. I am going to be releasing the new agreement before Christmas. It will be a trial run. It may fall flat, it may be ignored. It may be a success. In a period of student as ‘consumer’, it may be an uphill battle to push some of the responsibility back to our ‘buyers’. However, I hope that even if it shifts a little towards students understanding their role in our response to their feedback, that is a win as far as I am concerned.

Interesting publication by LTN members on Technology-enhanced Learning

Please see the link to the journal article ‘ A reflexive evaluation of technology-enhanced learning’, by BSC LTN members Suzanne Young and Helen Nichols.

https://journal.alt.ac.uk/index.php/rlt/article/view/1998

 

BSCLTN- Criminology at the Cutting Edge of the Curriculum

LTN conference Sept 2017

Criminology at the Cutting Edge of the Curriculum -Thursday 14th September 2017 at University of Derby

The British Society of Criminology Learning & Teaching Network Are Hosting:

Criminology at the Cutting Edge of the Curriculum on Thursday 14th September 2017 at University of Derby

Schedule
9 – 9.30 Registration and Refreshments

9.30 – 11 Session 1

11 – 11.15 Coffee

11.15 – 12.45 Session 2

12.45 – 1.15 Lunch

1.15 – 2.45 Session 3

3 – 4.30 Session 4

Session 1
Jill Dealey ‘Engaging Students with Social Justice.’
M. Michaux Parker + Cassidy Whitehead + Ana Aquino ‘A DIME’s Worth of Civic Engagement: Using an international diplomacy model as a framework for Social Justice-based civic engagement’
Natacha Harding ‘Delivering Boundaries and Engagement – Teaching about Sexual Offending’

Session 2
Michael Fiddler ‘Sherlock Holmes on Mars: using games in criminological teaching.’
Phil Johnson + Professor Stephen Case & David Manlow ‘Going back to ‘the old school’ via ‘the student experience’ and ‘undergraduate journey’?’
Debbie Jones + Emma Jones ‘Embedding Employability through Student Engagement and Experience across the Criminology Curricula’

Session 3
M. Michaux Parker + Bella Pavey ‘“Exploring POLR Opposites: using path of least resistance sub-scales as an assessment tool for new academic programs’
Jennifer Rainbow ‘Trigger Warnings in Criminology’
Dave Walsh ‘Interviewing’

Session 4
Stephanie Whitehead + Shay Clamme ‘The Affective Dynamics of Online Learning’
Suzanne Young + Helen Nichols ‘Using Technology in the Curriculum.’
Ruth McAlister ‘Putting the ‘cyber’ into cyber criminology.’

 

Criminology due to unprecedented changes in the social, economic and political landscapes is experiencing new avenues of exploration in a range of new frontiers from: border control, positive criminology, new forms of cyber crime, green criminology, state crimes, celebrity and crime, public criminology etc. We are keen to hear how such areas and many others are affecting the pedagogical practices, the learning and teaching methods, strategies, structures and assessments in order to deliver a curriculum that is relevant and impactful to students.

The aim of the conference is to provide a space to explore new and innovative ways of delivering an ever-complex curriculum. We recognise that there is no one size fits all approach. We therefore welcome papers that are still at the ideas stage, as well as those sharing experiences of their attempts to be innovative which have not worked as well as you had hoped but have now gained some insight and reflections on your experiences; and we welcome papers from those of you who have had successful ‘experiments’.

Venue:
One Friar Gate Square is the new home of Department of Social Sciences. A modern and iconic building in the heart of Derby’s vibrant city centre, it creates the perfect environment for innovative and engaging teaching.
We share One Friar Gate Square with Derby law School, as well as the International Policing and Justice Institute. This dedicated site offers unique opportunities for sharing knowledge, expertise and experience in all aspects of the criminological, legal and justice fields.

Address:
Department of Social Sciences
College of Business, Law & Social Sciences
One Friar Gate Square
University of Derby
Derby
DE1 1DZ