British Society of Criminology Conference 2019 Public Criminologies: Community, Conflict and Justice

British Society of Criminology Conference 2019

Public Criminologies: Community, Conflict and Justice

Postgraduate Conference: 2nd – 3rd July 2019

Main Conference: 3rd – 5th July 2019

The conference will explore the potential prospects for Criminology to ‘bridge the gap’ between academic criminology and public discourse. It will engage with important questions about the role and value of Criminology during a time of conflict and divergence, and hopes to provide meaningful reflections on the political realities of community, conflict and justice. The conference seeks to examine how criminologists can find and use their voice to articulate for collective good in an insecure world.

Taking place in 2019, the conference will explore what it means to conceptualise Criminology as a civic enterprise and address how criminologists might address issues of power, marginalisation, intersectionality and justice in the 21st Century.

*New Deadline for Abstract Submission: 26.05.19*

At this time in the academic year, we are aware that colleagues may need additional time to submit conference abstracts, and some delegates have been in touch about this. We are delighted to announce an extension to the abstract deadline which will now be 26.05.19. We’re seeing very positive numbers of registrations already, therefore we want to make sure that all prospective speakers have the opportunity to submit their abstracts and take part in what is looking to be a very exciting conference!

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Key dates:

* Call for Abstracts opens: Monday 7th January 2019* Early Bird registration opens: Monday 21st January 2019

* *New Deadline for Abstract Submission: 26.05.19*

* Early bird registration closes: Friday 17th May 2019

* Abstract-notification of decision: Within 1 month of submission

* Registration closes: Friday 21st June 2019

* Postgraduate Conference opens: Tuesday 2nd July 2019

* Main Conference opens: Wednesday 3rd July 2019

* Conference Closes: Friday 5th July 2019

The conference will be hosted by the University of Lincoln’s School of Social and Political Sciences and will take place in the vibrant waterside Brayford Pool campus located within minutes of the city centre in Lincoln. The conference will be split into two sections, with a postgraduate conference taking place between July 2nd – 3rd July, before the main conference runs July 3rd – 5th July.

The British Society of Criminology Conference 2019 will be relevant to both UK and international delegates, from academic and practice-based backgrounds, with an interest in: Criminology, Criminal Justice, Socio-legal Studies, Social Policy, Law, Human Rights, Psychology and Sociology.

 

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“Showcasing Excellence and Innovation in Teaching and Criminology and Criminal Justice” Wednesday 16th January Centre for Research and Innovation in Legal Education (University of Leeds) by Tanya Miles- Berry; Kate Strudwick and Suzanne Young (LTN)

Welcome from Andrew Francis – Director: Centre for Research and Innovation in Legal Education @cirle_leeds

Welcome to the day from Dr Suzanne Young:

The main aim of the day was to celebrate the innovative teaching and learning approaches and focus on the pedagogy that prize winners of the National Teaching Award for Teaching Excellence have achieved, and how those initiative’s have developed over the years.

The audience was reminded that the with the advent of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) the quality of the student offer will be under scrutiny and our subject areas will be judged on a range of metrics as well as a narrative which explores the environment created for students. This makes it more necessary than ever to reflect on why students do or do not engage, why students do or do not succeed, and what they particularly enjoy about the learning experience. This is perhaps more important for staff who teach on modules which include Criminology because of the huge rise in student numbers and courses – from 700 listed on UCAS last year to over 1000 this year, across 156 institutions – because although this means there are plenty of jobs around for those who can teach the discipline, it is also the case that most can agree it is far easier to provide an excellent learning experience for small groups of students. We therefore need to focus on providing a good experience for large numbers of students.

It was noted that there is far more focus and accolades involved with producing 4* REF papers than there is in providing an excellent student experience, which in turn means that groups such as the BSC Learning and Teaching Network is more important than ever before, precisely because it does recognise the challenges. With so few opportunities to focus or publish on learning and teaching this forum provides an opportunity to recognise and encourage those who are interested in enhancing the student experience and improving pedagogical approaches to ensure that is achievable. The LTN is about providing opportunities for greater communication, provide a vehicle for the sharing of good practice and disseminate resources and literature on pedagogy.

Panel 1: Excellence and innovation on campus 

“Partnering Academics and Criminal Justice Practitioners as Teachers: The Criminal Justice Process Comes to the Classroom” Professor Chris Birkbeck and Dr Muzammil Quraishi, University of Salford 

The development process started 10 years ago when there was a recognition that although they had developed numerous partnerships with practitioners and researchers, they could perhaps develop a module which could harness that practical experience with the academic knowledge of the academics in order to produce a stimulating and exciting module which would allow students to contextualise how criminal justice ‘works’.

The focus is on decision making and based on the models of criminal justice which are mapped onto policy to highlight the thematic tensions inherent within the system. They use 2 hypothetical cases, one of which is ‘serious’ – in this case Kidnap and Rape of a Minor, and one ‘volume’ crime – in this case Burglary and ATWOC.

Each session is scheduled to take 3 hours which is broken into 3 sections:

  1. overview delivered by the practitioner partners
  2. group work involving specific tasks and reflections
  3. thematic academic elements lecture linked to the assessment

The module is assessed with a 2500 word essay which involves students choosing 1 of 5 themes on which to base their work. They are expected to cite the practitioners and refer to the academic literature as they connect their points to the case specifically in relation to the practical elements such as how to manage incidents and the media.

What was clear was that much of the discussion that took place was not referred to or recognised in the essays, so the teaching team added an additional piece of assessment – a 3000 word reflective diary which encourages students to give their opinions about the cases and tensions involved with the processes discussed. The diary is completed each week so is complete by the end of the module and the suggested focus – what models of criminal justice are evident? What conflicts? Does the topic resonate with other aspects of criminological knowledge? How has our knowledge of CJP been advanced?

The module consistently receives excellent feedback from all involved, not least because this type of learning environment also results in the practitioners acquiring new knowledge whilst the academics and students are kept fully up to date with the latest practical knowledge.

The module is challenging to run because of the coordination needed to ensure effective delivery. This coordination is more demanding because of the amount of administration required to ensure, for example, parking passes are ordered and payment is made on time.

It also has to be recognised that this type of module is more expensive than more traditional modules and some in the audience commented that they have had similar modules removed from the syllabus due to this. Furthermore, a recurrent theme from all of the presenters in this Panel was that they do go above and beyond to ensure

success precisely because they recognise the benefits – and if they didn’t, the modules would not succeed.

“The Lincoln Effect’: Student as Producer, Innovative Assessments and Good Practice” Kate Strudwick and Jill Jameson, University of Lincoln 

Lincoln won the award in 2013 and were one of the first criminology courses to embed employability at every level. They achieved this by focusing on the student centered learning and scaffolding as they tried to develop the ability for students to think critically and independently. They offered a range of alternative pedagogical approaches at all levels, offered students the opportunity to get involved in research with academics from the very start of their course and based all of this on ‘Student as Producer’ (Neary & Winn, 2009) which has since been embedded across not only the School but the University as a whole. In order to achieve this they were granted funding both internally and externally and they aimed their work and focus towards several principles:

* encourage research as a form of discovery

* using technology in teaching

* teaching spaces and spatiality more generally

* assessment

* research and evaluations

* student voice – developing student responsibility for learning and teaching for future generations

* support for research based teaching through expert engagement

* information resources

* creating for the future

The speakers used 3 modules to contextualise what they have achieved:

‘Criminology in the Professions’

* a platform for enhancing the Student as Producer through the criminology curriculum

* designed to identify the links between academic knowledge/ theory and professional practice/ employability skills

* teaching and learning embraces partnerships and collaboration with joint practitioner/ academic lectures and students teaching their peers

Ultimately they were trying to encourage students to look more broadly at the professions – what skills do they have and what do they need to be able to do to get where they want to be.

The module includes a discourse analysis of the practitioner lectures and 10% of the final mark is based on participation events – such as career workshops, an alumni evening and peer reflections – and attendance at teaching sessions.

They have also established links to the ‘Lincoln Award’ – which is an employability framework to support, enhance and recognise extra-curricular activities.

Further developments include:

  • A Lincoln Police Lincoln Award – specifically for students to get an award based on tier extra-curricular activities work with the Police such as voluntary PCSOs, university Helpdesk to the police, youth justice awards.
  • Further modules developed in collaboration with external partnerships (Youth Justice; Police Studies)
  • Teaching innovation funded projects (student reps; enhancing engagement; Crime stoppers; Get SAVI (gender based violence))
  • intention to work further with HMP Lincoln and the Lincoln Action Trust

‘Youth Justice Live’

Developed in collaboration with Lincolnshire YOS – developed by students in collaboration with those practitioners, and used a ‘community of practice’ model. A live Twitter feed and blog are used to invite students to react ‘live’ to changes in policy and practice.

The assessment is based on YOS files which are used during the module, enabling the staff to provide anecdotes and updates.

Further opportunities are in development, but will include initiatives around volunteering, researching and placements/ shadowing/ mentoring

‘Police Studies’

This involves collaboration with the police from the PCC right through to front line officers in an attempt to bring practice and theory together.

The assessment is based on one of the practitioner lectures. They have to complete a essay with a poster being presented at a policing conference at Police Headquarters. The event is attended by the Chief Constable, Police and Crime Commissioner and other policing practitioners. The work has been recognised as encouraging students to address ‘real world’ perspectives. As part of the module marks are also awarded for attendance and participation at the event.

Some of the challenges involved with this type of work include:

* the tensions around the fact that students are not paid for their work for ‘Students as Producers’ although they are offered the opportunity to deliver at conferences, vouchers may be offered and they might also co-author papers with staff

* managing expectations can be difficult

* NSS and student evaluation making staff risk averse?

* there tends to be a hard core of students who take part in as many activities as possible – how to engage the less engaged is an ongoing issue

* it can be hard to keep things going and there are resource tensions

The speakers underlined the need for us to be able to provide evidence about the impact of what we do because student engagement is so important to the TEF narrative, and there will be Learning and Teaching strand at the BSC conference this year in Lincoln.

“Innovation, Empowerment and Real-World Application: Making Desistance and Recovery a Reality” Dr Alexandria Bradley, Leeds Beckett University and Dr Sarah Goodwin, Sheffield Hallam University 

This module involved collaboration with a range of key stakeholders and focused on raising confidence, self esteem and aspirations of the student group. The module encouraged students to get out volunteering and build their C.V’s to prepare for work and they received plenty of advice and ideas about what to expect at interviews, the form they may take and the questions that may be asked. In order to provide accurate information in that regard, the teaching team liaised with a number of local charities and asked what questions they would ask potential employees which in turn ensured that students knew what the current direction and issues in the filed were.

To encourage student engagement a Twitter # was used along with the theory – policy – practice triangle and staff would highlight issues and news and ask students to participate in discussion and debate.

The assessment was a 4000 word portfolio:

  1. Community engagement plan (500 words) – to design a press release about a service – students were expected to look at what was out there and apply their ideas as to what was needed.
  2. Service Evaluation Bid (1500 words) – theory and practice based evidence to inform an evaluation
  3. Business case for a new desistance and recovery initiative (2500 words) – students had to pick a specific marginalised group, then apply theory, policy and practice to develop an initiative, thinking critically about the hurdles and barriers to succeeding.

The staff used their own professional networks including PhD students and alumni, and asked on Twitter for professionals who might be interested in taking part. Many of those involved recorded lectures or screencasts and video debates were also incorporated in order that challenges around coordinating attendance and associated admin was hugely cut back.

They used national policy developers to give brief overviews of what is actually happening out ‘in the real world’ and filmed walk-throughs of services to enhance the students ‘lived experience’.

By collaborating with professionals in this way students could begin to develop their own professional networks, and be privy to volunteering opportunities. This also helped to demystify the profession which in turn enhanced student confidence.

One further belief was that by enhancing student criticality and understanding, they would become not only more employable but also more compassionate which in turn would enhance their future practice. Several students reported using examples for the module at successful job interviews.

Panel 2: Excellence and innovation beyond the campus

“Learning Together Across the Ages” Dr Helen Nichols, University of Lincoln and Dr Serena Wright , Royal Holloway University of London 

This paper explored experiences, impact and transformations of providing ‘Learning Together’ Programmes at different institutions with the Prison Education Trust. The issues related to age with the relevance of study skills being seen as important in both of the schemes- embedding subject specific skills.

Age in YMYOI Feltham was discussed as being ‘omni present’ with the narratives and engagement having some relevance to both setting and context. Gender was also identified as being omnipresent. The importance pedagogically about engaging with cohorts was explored through discussions of the setting of the classroom, which was seen by some of the cohort as providing an ‘escape’ from a chaotic environment. The ‘Learning Together’ programme was seen to offer a tool to resist prison paths. With reference to Alice Goffman (2015) Dr Wright noted the commitment to higher education and learning with the importance of student identity being  urther seen as an ability to explore academic abilities. The presentation continued with a reflection from Dr Nichols on the ‘Learning Together’ Programme with Full Sutton. As a different ‘Learning Together ‘Programme the paper reflected on experiences learnt. The aim was described to replicate modules in high security prisons through a team taught module. Motivations to do the module were also discussed as being different, which could be related to a number of factors which resulted in an increase of confidence, and had an open-minded humanising effect. The impact for Full Sutton student’s appetite for Higher Education was also noted with the programme further seen to enhance the skills of Leeds Beckett Students.

Experiences and outcomes were explored in this paper – it was about learning from each other! Questions were raised about whether Prison Learning Together prisoners’ experiences mirror those of students within Higher Education with evaluations  addressing  factors of risk, age and correlation with ‘non-learner’ identity. The diverse nature of the student cohorts resulted in the development of a culture which broke down social barriers.

The paper was a reflection on what to do with Learning Together and how these Programmes empower from the beginning. The paper ended on a thought-provoking note for the LTN – how can these programmes be developed and delivered – this may be a topic for further discussion by the LTN- a natural place to conclude.

“Building Bridges Across Diversity: Utilising the Inside – out Prison Exchange Programme to promote an Egalitarian Higher Education Community within Three English Prisons” Dr Hannah King, Professor Fiona Measham, Dr Kate O’Brian, University of Durham 

The paper started with a quote from Lori Pompa- the Inside Out founder (2013). Addressing key elements and reasons for its development in the US the adoption of the programme in the UK was explained. Core terminology such as Think Tank and the training processes were explored to set the context for understanding the programme. The importance of breaking down barriers through circle seating in the classroom enabled a dialogue approach placed within a critical pedagogical module. The relevance of the programme was its ability to provide a context for a sharing community not an ‘othering’ one. This was eplored through the work of Freire “directive of the process” (1996:46) which emphasised the importance of the recruitment process and also the logistics of being Inside out to the UK. The paper discussed examples of classroom sessions and how surfacing ideas and the ways in which ideas were developed addressed relevant factors, fables were provided as an example.

There was a noted  importance about  the way in which the module was constructed, to address power, privilege and identity. Reflections for the Inside and outside students made reference sto the programme being ‘transformative’. Recent plans to involve alumni from Inside out seek  to invite them to co-deliver the programme.

Keynote “Future directions and challenges for teaching Criminology and Criminal Justice” by Professor Stephen Case, Loughborough University 

The paper was to present thoughts, experiences and challenges – effectively his journey while also addressing what he was trying to achieve and what the barriers might be. The paper started by identifying the dearth of learning and teaching in Criminology through his career journey. The importance of pedagogical literature on course design, Student as Partners assessment sand the impact of aligning this with benchmarks. Starting  the dialogue about Learning and teaching was reflected back to the HEA Conference in 2007 when the BSC Teaching Excellence prize was developed and the Special issue of the journal was also announced. The mindset of this era was discussed, the role of the HEA and the introduction of teaching qualifications which  started to make LT a  priority at institutions.

The 3 E’s- Effective, Engaging and Employability set out the next phase of the discussion.  ‘Effective’  made  references to cutting edge texts, how there is a need to maximise experiences for students in recognising  ‘how to’ encourage students to be motivated, show critical thought and  encourage creativity and reflective students. ‘Engaged’ referred to maximising student engagement and the engaging nature of the programme – this was seen as being fundamental. ‘Employable’ was aligned to developing skills to enhance employability and to work together to underpin this,  not just in the final year but throughout the programme.

The 3 C’s recognised challenges which were  identified as being part of the competitive nature of the discipline, the need to innovate and how to make your institution distinctive. Such values were seen as value for money, contact hours, work experience and the subjects we teach. The importance of quality assurance was also raised as integral to how students rate our teaching- this needs to be ensured through regular communication with colleagues and though materials on course and facilities. SSR’s were discussed in the context of recruitment and cohort size- questioning how we engage with a large cohort? This was presented as one of the very real challenges facing us. Issues to address were student satisfaction and expectations- they were both presented as challenges which can be understood through dialogue and managing expectations and transparency. The priorities of institutions were raised as being pedagogically involved teaching and to become ‘thought leaders.

In the final section ‘what next’ the TEF was identified  as an opportunity to focus our mindset on teaching and learning- shown by the LTN at such events! Ending on positive notes the importance for he LTN to host events was seen to encourage and share best practices,  but there was a reminder that this needs to be done outside of these events too!  In order to keep Learning and teaching on the agenda making sure it is ‘live’t he message was that we need to communicate on a disciplinary level and really get behind the LT agenda.

Summary notes from LTN Chair Kate Strudwick

The paper by Professor Case summed up the aims and ethos of this LTN symposium on ‘Showcasing Excellence and Innovation in Teaching Criminology and Criminal Justice’. This event has provided  opportunities to reflect with like minded peers on ‘what we do well’ pedagogically, enabling greater learning about the journeys of others and understand experiences which can provide valuable means to develop innovative teaching and learning approaches within Higher Education.

The National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology and Criminal Justice 2019.

This award is intended to highlight and celebrate outstanding practice/innovative teaching in Criminology across HEIs in the UK and it is supported by the British Society of Criminology, the HEA, and SAGE who sponsor the annual prize. Applications are welcomed from individuals or small clusters of teaching staff who can be early career or well as established academics and/or Criminology/Criminal Justice Teaching Teams. Applicants can be self-nominated but nominations will also be accepted by academic colleagues for learning and teaching practice they feel should be recognised.  The criteria for nominations have been informed by the UK Professional Standards Frameworkfor teaching and supporting learning.

 

The winner/s of the award will be announced and the prize presented at the annual BSC Conference.  However the BSC reserves the right not to award the prize in any given year if the submissions received do not clearly identify what it is that is particularly outstanding or innovative in the delivery of teaching and learning in the applicant’s Criminology and/or Criminal Justice Module/Programme.  It should also be understood that this award is not to ratify or support the rigour of a Criminology/Criminal Justice Programme – that is already covered in-house by University Quality Assurance requirements and External Examination process.  Programme applications are therefore discouraged and particular aspects of innovation within programmes encouraged.  It is about identifying, acknowledging and disseminating ‘excellence’ in relation to learning and teaching; something that we can all learn from.  Therefore the focus of your applications should be clearly evidenced on specific practice!

 

Submissions

Each nomination must be accompanied by a covering letter, countersigned by the Head of Department/Head of Learning and Teaching (or equivalent), together with a short overview of no more than 2000 words explaining the learning experience and how this not only meets the UK Professional Standards Framework but why it is significant and how it represents excellence. Supporting evidence is also required and this can be in the form of statements from a colleague, peer review report, and if applicable student feedback/comments.

 

In order to make the award available to those teaching criminology across the academy, eligibility for the award is not restricted to BSC members but nominations from non-members will have to be accompanied by a letter of support from a BSC member and the award winner will be encouraged to become a member prior to the presentation of the prize.

 

Entries should be submitted by Friday1stMarch 2019to Suzanne Young, s.young@leeds.ac.ukand Tanya Miles-Berry T.Miles-Berry@shu.ac.uk

 

Nomination Form

The nomination form can be downloaded from here:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1cd8AZ_zTFavYnoX7n9WotL3m6gZE3N1mw-xnjNpgsig/edit?usp=sharing

 

Guideline criteria

The Awards Panel will require evidence that the applicant’s submission meets the QAA Criminology Benchmarks for Learning and Teaching and should therefore include at least one of the following areas:

  • The use of innovative teaching strategies to make a positive contribution to learning and teaching of criminology that is flexible and inclusive in mode of delivery
  • The clear demonstration of an approach that enhances the teaching and learning experience to that which would normally be expected
  • The incorporation of criminologicalresearch, scholarship and/or professional practice into teaching that is centred around skill building and self-development
  • The development of a teaching strategy to meet the needs of a diverse student population including diverse political, cultural and social contexts
  • Inclusive teaching practices which encourage collegiality and provide varied contexts for learning
  • Commitment to the development of autonomy and critical thinking skills in students within criminology
  • Teaching practice that is clearly grounded in the academic literature on pedagogy in HEIs.

 

The L&T Committee will determine the eligibility of submitted proposals, select a shortlist, which will then be passed to the judges who will decide the winning entry.

 

Winners will be awarded with a, sponsored by Sage prize, consisting of £100, plus £100 worth of SAGE books.

 

The Awards Panel reserves the right not to make the award, in the event that the standard of submissions is not deemed sufficient.

 

Awards Panel

Stuart Agnew

Dr Linda Asquith

Liz Austen

Dr Martyn Chamberlain

Dr Michael Fiddler

Dr Liz Frondigoun

Dr Nic Groombridge

Natacha Harding

Dr Mathew Jones

Dr Phil Johnson

Debbie Jones

David Manlow

Ian Marder

Tanya Miles-Berry

Dr Andrew Newton

Dr Helen Nichols

David Patten

Katie Strudwick

Pamela Ugwudike

Angus MacCulloch

Henry Yeomans

Dr Suzanne Young

 

 

Sponsored by

SAGEHEA logo

 

Upcoming event: Showcasing Excellence and Innovation in Teaching Criminology and Criminal Justice – 16th January 2019

Showcasing Excellence and Innovation in Teaching Criminology and Criminal Justice

The Centre for Research and Innovation in Legal Education (CIRLE) is proud to be hosting the 2018 annual conference of the British Society of Criminology’s Learning and Teaching Network.

The Centre for Research and Innovation in Legal Education (CIRLE) is proud to be hosting the 2019 annual conference of the British Society of Criminology’s Learning and Teaching Network. This one day event will bring together leading innovators in criminology and criminal justice education to showcase best practice in higher education. The aim of the day is to discuss what innovation in criminal justice looks like, why such programmes are successful and what impact they have on the students. The day will consist of papers from across the discipline from people who have either been nominated or won the BSC Learning and Teaching Prize. The event will draw to a close with a keynote from Professor Stephen Case who will discuss the future direction of learning and teaching in criminology and criminal justice in the UK.

Programme

Details of the programme will be confirmed shortly before the event. In the meantime, we are delighted to welcome the below confirmed speakers:

  • Professor Chris Birkbeck and Dr Muzammil Quraishi – University of Salford
  • Dr Alexandria Bradley and Dr Sarah Goodwin– Sheffield Hallam University
  • Dr Gill Brown – University of Bolton
  • Professor Stephen Case – Loughborough University
  • Dr Hannah King, Professor Fiona Measham, Dr Kate O’Brien – University of Durham
  • David Manlow – University of Westminster
  • Dr Helen Nichols and Dr Serena Wright – University of Lincoln and Royal Holloway
  • Kate Strudwick – University of Lincoln

Alongside a wide variety of papers, there will be opportunities for informal networking during and after the conference.

Please register here for the conference.

Location Details

Moot Court,
School of Law
Liberty Building
University of Leeds
LS2 9JT

For sat navs, please use the postcode for Moorland Road, LS6 1AN.

The Liberty Building can also be found on the campus map.

All welcome. This is a free event, though registration is required.

The information you provide will be held by the School of Law, University of Leeds in accordance with the University’s Data Protection Policy. We will use this information to provide you with updates relating to the event you have registered to attend and may contact you following the event to request feedback (feedback is optional). Information will be retained until the event has passed, unless you request to be kept informed about future events from us.

Bringing Learning and Teaching to the Forefront of British Criminology by Dr. Suzanne Young

This year’s British Society of Criminology conference included two separate panels on learning and teaching that aimed to open up discussions on how we deliver teaching and learning and showcase innovate practices. Whilst it was great to see more learning and teaching being incorporated into this year’s conference, research papers still very much dominated the focus of the event. Following on from the conference, this blog hopes to open up wider discussion on why learning and teaching should be brought to the forefront of Criminology in the UK and ways in which it can be achieved.

By in large, learning and teaching is only a small focus for British Criminology. The BSC learning and teaching networkhas just over 20 members even though criminology is being taught in over 700 higher education courses in the UK (as either single or joint honours). The number of students choosing to study Criminology continues to grow and this has led to a growth in staff required to deliver the courses. Even with the popularity of the discipline and the increase in Criminology teaching posts, learning and teaching is very much separated from criminological research and this can be witnessed in a number of different ways. There is a distinct lack of research and writing that focuses on teaching Criminology, scholarship of this kind is largely confined to departments or schools and used to improve or reflect on individual courses. So, there may be some great work innovative Criminology and Criminal Justice courses, but we rarely hear about it. The BSC National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology and Criminal Justice, sponsored by Sage, has been a great way to celebrate excellence in Criminology, but each year it is surprising how few nominations are submitted, particularly given the size of the discipline.

Despite efforts of the BSC Learning and Teaching Network who host events nationwide, it is only a small number of academics who attend and contribute to these events. The presence of learning and teaching scholarship at regional and national criminology conferences and events is minimal in comparison to those on research and criminal justice policy and practice. Another problem is that for people who do undertake research specifically on Criminology teaching and learning, it can be very difficult to find the right outlet for publishing. Most social science teaching and learning journals are American based, such as the Sage Teaching Sociology Journal, the Journal of Criminal Justice Education or the Journal of Political Science Education.  Undertaking a quick search through the British Journal of Criminology and Crime and Criminal Justice journal highlights that neither have any articles on teaching and learning. This results in generic HE journals becoming the main outlet for research findings, which often do not reach the audience of the discipline. This all indicates that teaching and learning are not at the forefront of British Criminology despite the growth in the number of institutions offering courses and the number of people teaching the discipline. In North America we see a different approach whereby they have a dedicated journal and the annual American Society of Criminology conference has an abundance of sessions discussing teaching and learning.

I suggest that learning and teaching is more important now than it has ever been given the current climate on higher education in Britain. The majority of academic staff spend a large proportion of their time on teaching and learning activities. For instance the 2016 UCU workload surveyshows that those on teaching and research contracts spent double amount of their time on teaching than research. The 2017 Times Higher Education teaching surveyfound that more than half of academics surveyed spend much more time on teaching related activities than admin or research. Given the amount of time and resources spent on teaching and learning within the discipline, it is questionable why we do not have wider discussions around how that teaching and assessment is undertaken and what is deemed to be effective teaching and learning in criminology. There are increasing debates  around the research and teaching relationship, for instance the Times Higher Education recently published an article entitled Are teaching and research mutually exclusive?Pedagogical expertise is just as important as research expertise, but continues to be deemed less valuable in many cases.

The next important reason for a greater focus on teaching and learning is the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF).  The teaching excellence framework is currently being piloted at subject, rather than institutional, level. This means that subject areas are going to be measured and judged on their teaching and learning and will likely involve showcasing teaching and learning impact case studies and examples of best practice. Given it is still in the pilot phase and going through consultation, we don’t fully know what it will look like. However, from 2019/20, TEF will be assessed at subject and institutional levels. The 3 main metrics used (again these may change for subject level) are the learning environment, the NSS and student outcomes (i.e. where students go after graduating). Thus, there are implications here for Criminology and we need to consider how to address these should our institutions take part in TEF. In addition, the 2021 Research Excellence Framework (REF) is accepting subject specific pedagogical outputs and case studies that demonstrate impact on teaching, thus subject level learning and teaching is gaining recognition within both excellence frameworks.

A further important reason to put teaching and learning at the forefront of British criminology is the new office for students, which came into effect this year. Their regulatory framework is designed to protect students by ensuring they are getting value for money and receive a high quality academic experience. This means that courses ought to consider whatis taught in criminology and criminal justice and howit is taught and assessed. Although Criminology is often taught in combination with other disciplines (i.e. law, sociology, social policy, psychology), when it comes to the university subject league tables it stands as its own discipline. This means that as a subject it is being judged and measured on the quality of the course, progression, outcomes and employability.

Taking all these together, I believe that we need to be putting a greater focus on teaching and learning in Criminology. We need to talk about it more widely, we should be sharing practice, undertaking scholarly pedagogical research, and treating it as equally important as our research projects. There are some small steps that could be taken such as including more criminology and criminal justice pedagogy research in the mainstream criminology journals and having more teaching and learning presence at regional and national events. As a member of the BSC Learning and Teaching network, I hope that the excellent criminology learning and teaching that occurs across UK universities becomes more widely recognised and celebrated.

 

Blog post- ‘criminology in a chaotic world’ Reflections from the event. By Kate Strudwick and Natacha Harding

‘Criminology in a chaotic world’- debate and discussions can share good practice!

 

Criminology in a chaotic world – 3rd May The University of Winchester

The timing of this one day teaching and learning symposium was very pertinent given the challenges we all face in the current chaotic time of teaching and research in Criminology. Through a selection of presented papers and interactive workshop the discussions brought together shared experiences on the challenges of teaching topics such as miscarriages of justice, hate crime, terrorism and incorporating theory into your teaching.

Starting with an enthusiastic welcome from Dr Angus Paddison, Dean of Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, the symposium was opened with a presentation by Dr Jill Dealey on teaching miscarriages of justice to a multi disciplinary cohort of Undergraduate students. Drawing on experiences of applying live case work in partnerships with Inside Justice, Proof magazine and Justice Gap website the module demonstrated an excellent example of partnerships working in practice. The positives learnt from co-ordinating the module identified the many rewarding aspects of it, both from student perspective and as a tutor. Looking to future plans for peer assisted learning within this module, such as possible experiences that could be learnt from Crime Live events and ‘Inside justice’, by putting the ‘public’ into Criminology practice for public audiences investigating MOJ were also discussed.

The following paper By Dr Matt Clement discussed his experiences of using databases to teach undergraduates definitions of radicalization, hate crimes and terrorism, by applying the work of Hamm and Spaaij database/ work. Drawing on his experiences of how to tackle teaching the myths around terrorism, understandings could be learnt through database evaluations. The module demonstrated how students can become researchers using the media as a formula.

The final paper in session one by Dr Aaron Pycroft tackled the trials of teaching complexity theory to undergraduates. Discussing how this called for more creativity in thinking about criminological theory, via virtual and actual revisiting of theories towards ethics of justice. Concluding that links needed to be fully understood to allow such innovations to be embedded in curriculum design. Arguing that there is a need to avoid polarisation and work towards breaking out of silos to present a new way of thinking about criminological issues.

Learning about the challenges of teaching new technologies Greta Squires and Dr Dan Burrows presented a workshop on blended learning. In their curriculum development review they explored how they have brought blended learning into practice through research enquiry led teaching on the criminology of warfare, gun crime, violence, criminology border and crimmigration. Presenting the case for blended learning they argued for the lecturers to be more actively engaged in their use of technology. Working through some of the practicalities that come with large cohorts, specific examples of using Nearpod, Kahoot, Poll everywhere and VR google were demonstrated to the participants. They addressed reflections from participants on how, as criminologists, we use blended learning to inform practice, and how such technologies can be a tool but also highlighted the importance of their suitability for specific modules.

Craig Webber presented his paper on managing student expectations by discussing the perceived problems with managing the tensions that come with NSS scores and co ordinating combined criminology and psychology programmes. Addressing the age old questions of ‘what is criminology’ and the complexities of such definitions,  the need to ‘Bridge that divide’ with relationships betweeb media/public/ the web/ academia were debated. Bringing in the TEF impact and the myriad of further challenges led to a critical and challenging discussion.

Nicola Cadet and Andrew Fowler presented their paper on rendezvous criminology through the gaze of simulation modules. The theme was on embedding employability into degree programmes through the ‘crim pal’ schemes, internships and practice on placements- effectively bringing the real world in. Applying Mezirow’s 10 stage process for transformative learning- questioned what students can do in placements and enabled the presenters to address some of the realities, but also highlight how placements can be empowering and challenge beliefs.

The final paper by Peter Squires and Hannah Thurston finished the symposium with a fitting exploration of ‘Transcending the criminological imagination’ though their cross cultural module.   The context setting of criminology as a discipline was an excellent way to being together some of the themes discussed earlier of research led/ research informed teaching within the threshold of criminology. The key to their paper was to emphasise the importance of looking ‘outside the box’ to move forward. Their cross cultural module used the cultural context to help students to understand global politics and crime, thus open their eyes to the globe! Such illustrations demonstrated how they were attempting to broaden the criminal justice box!

The final roundtable session again effectively brought together common themes and trends from the day. ‘How to prepare students in chaotic world?’ enabled participants to debate where criminology has changed, developed, the debates of what is perceived as core and why we attempt to ‘sugar the pill?’ The scope to be creative was seen as core to appreciating the criminology which exists in many institutions. External pressures, assessment models, employability and the impact of central control mechanisms ended the discursive symposium off suitably with participants leaving with perhaps more questions than answers, but importantly many new ideas to bring back to their own institutions and teaching teams ready for the approaching academic year.

 

 

Kate Strudwick and Natacha Harding

 

 

Criminology in a Chaotic World Symposium(British Society of Criminology L&T Network) 3rd May 2018- Extension to abstract deadline ( 16th March 2018)

British Society of Criminology Learning and Teaching Network

Call for Papers – One Day Symposium – “Criminology in a Chaotic World”

Venue: King Alfred Campus, University of Winchester, Sparkford Road, Winchester, SO22 4NR

Date: Thursday 3rd May 2018

Issues around crime and justice have a particular role to play in political dialogue in an era when the established global structure appears to be in turmoil and constant flux. The rise of nationalistic and increasingly protectionist politics across many countries have signalled a period of increasingly punitive approaches to crime and criminality. As we develop our students to potentially be the next generation of criminal justice employees, as educators are in a challenging position in delivering a curriculum that addresses such issues, targets misinformation head on and prepares our students for the chaotic world they will be working in all while acknowledging the increasing politically diverse student base.

This symposium aims to explore these challenges and the associated opportunities of teaching criminology in this climate. We encourage the sharing of best practice, exploring ideas and innovations taking place in criminology curriculum and discussing new ideas as part of the day.

We welcome abstracts on the following themes:

  • Student political diversity as a teaching tool
  • Diversity and difference in criminology
  • Global challenges, local teaching
  • Preparing students for an unknown post-graduation working world
  • Embedding chaos into teaching

Abstracts will be accepted in the following formats –

  • Single Paper Presentation
  • Panel Presentation (a set of 3 papers presented in either slots of 10 minutes, followed by 30 minutes discussion)
  • Other (please let us know if you would like to do something different)

Submission instructions

Please email your 300 word abstract submission as a word document to Natacha Harding (natacha.harding@winchester.ac.uk). In addition, please state the full names of all authors, the title of the paper, which theme the abstract is being submitted for consideration, and also which institution/organisation you are from.

There has been an extension to the deadline for the submission of abstracts for the day to Friday 16th March 2018.

Key Dates:

  • 14 December 2017 – Call for papers opens and booking opens
  • 30 March 2018 – All abstracts confirmed
  • 3 May 2018 – Symposium

Call for submissions to National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology 2018

The National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology 2018

This award is intended to highlight and celebrate outstanding practice/innovative teaching in Criminology across HEIs in the UK and it is supported by the British Society of Criminology, the HEA, and SAGE who sponsor the annual prize. Applications are welcomed from individuals or small clusters of teaching staff who can be early career or well as established academics and/or Criminology/Criminal Justice Teaching Teams.

Applicants can be self-nominated but nominations will also be accepted by academic colleagues for a learning and teaching practice they feel should be recognised. The criteria for nominations have been informed by the UK Professional Standards Framework for teaching and supporting learning.

The winner/s of the award will be announced and the prize presented at the annual BSC Conference. However, the BSC reserves the right not to award the prize in any given year if the submissions received do not clearly identify what it is that is particularly outstanding or innovative in the delivery of teaching and learning in the applicant’s Criminology and/or Criminal Justice Module/Programme. It should also be understood that this award is not to ratify or support the rigour of a Criminology/Criminal Justice Programme – that is already covered in-house by University Quality Assurance requirements and External Examination process. Programme applications are therefore discouraged and particular aspects of innovation within programmes encouraged. It is about identifying, acknowledging and disseminating ‘excellence’ in relation to learning and teaching; something that we can all learn from. Therefore, the focus of your applications should be clearly evidenced on specific practice.

Submissions

Each nomination must be accompanied by a covering letter, countersigned by the Head of Department/Head of Learning and Teaching (or equivalent), together with a short overview of no more than 2000 words explaining the learning experience and how this not only meets the UK Professional Standards Framework but why it is significant and how it represents excellence. Supporting evidence is also required and this can be in the form of statements from a colleague, peer review report, and if applicable student feedback/comments.

Application forms can be downloaded from the link below:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FqtDBOKFG_wngfw30TPp1UhmaJcDS3My91Jsy0K7K5U/edit?usp=sharing

In order to make the award available to those teaching criminology across the academy, eligibility for the award is not restricted to BSC members but nominations from non-members will have to be accompanied by a letter of support from a BSC member and the award winner will be encouraged to become a member prior to the presentation of the prize.

Entries should be submitted by 12th February 2018 to Suzanne.young@leedsbeckett.ac.uk and T.Miles-Berry@shu.ac.uk

Guideline criteria

The Awards Panel will require evidence that the applicant’s submission meets the QAA Criminology Benchmarks for Learning and Teaching and should therefore include at least one of the following areas:

  • The use of innovative teaching strategies to make a positive contribution to learning and teaching of criminology that is flexible and inclusive in mode of delivery
  • The clear demonstration of an approach that enhances the teaching and learning experience to that which would normally be expected
  • The incorporation of criminological research, scholarship and/or professional practice into teaching that is centred around skill building and self-development
  • The development of a teaching strategy to meet the needs of a diverse student population including diverse political, cultural and social contexts
  • Inclusive teaching practices which encourage collegiality and provide varied contexts for learning
  • Commitment to the development of autonomy and critical thinking skills in students within criminology
  • Teaching practice that is clearly grounded in the academic literature on pedagogy in HEIs.

The L&T Committee will determine the eligibility of submitted proposals, select a shortlist, which will then be passed to the judges who will decide the winning entry.

The award, sponsored by Sage, consists of £100, plus £100 worth of SAGE books. Winners of the award will be invited to write a full paper for future publication in the BSC Journal Criminology and Criminal Justice, which will be subject to the Journal’s normal editorial and peer review processes. The winner will also be invited to write a short article for the BSC and HEA newsletters.

The Awards Panel reserves the right not to make the award, in the event that the standard of submissions is not deemed sufficient

If you have any questions about the application, please get in touch with us.

 

Suzanne Young, Senior Lecturer in Criminology: Leeds Beckett University

Suzanne.young@lledsbeckett.ac.uk

 

Tanya Miles-Berry, Principal Lecturer in Criminology: Sheffield Hallam University

T.Miles-Berry@shu.ac.uk

 

Awards Panel

Stuart Agnew

Dr Linda Asquith

Liz Austen

Dr Martyn Chamberlain

Dr Michael Fiddler

Dr Liz Frondigoun

Dr Nic Groombridge

Natacha Harding

Dr Mathew Jones

Dr Phil Johnson

Debbie Jones

David Manlow

Ian Marder

Tanya Miles-Berry

Dr Andrew Newton

Dr Helen Nichols

David Patten

Katie Strudwick

Pamela Ugwudike

Angus MacCulloch

Henry Yeomans

Dr Suzanne Young

 

Judges

Professor John Craig, Leeds Beckett University

Professor Stephen Case, Loughborough University

Dr Mary Corcoran, Keele University

 

Sponsored by

 


HEA logoSAGE

Criminology in a Chaotic World Symposium(British Society of Criminology L&T Network) 3rd May 2018

British Society of Criminology Learning and Teaching Network

Call for Papers – One Day Symposium – “Criminology in a Chaotic World”

Venue: King Alfred Campus, University of Winchester, Sparkford Road, Winchester, SO22 4NR

Date: Thursday 3rd May 2018

Issues around crime and justice have a particular role to play in political dialogue in an era when the established global structure appears to be in turmoil and constant flux. The rise of nationalistic and increasingly protectionist politics across many countries have signalled a period of increasingly punitive approaches to crime and criminality. As we develop our students to potentially be the next generation of criminal justice employees, as educators are in a challenging position in delivering a curriculum that addresses such issues, targets misinformation head on and prepares our students for the chaotic world they will be working in all while acknowledging the increasing politically diverse student base.

This symposium aims to explore these challenges and the associated opportunities of teaching criminology in this climate. We encourage the sharing of best practice, exploring ideas and innovations taking place in criminology curriculum and discussing new ideas as part of the day.

We welcome abstracts on the following themes:

  • Student political diversity as a teaching tool
  • Diversity and difference in criminology
  • Global challenges, local teaching
  • Preparing students for an unknown post-graduation working world
  • Embedding chaos into teaching

Abstracts will be accepted in the following formats –

  • Single Paper Presentation
  • Panel Presentation (a set of 3 papers presented in either slots of 10 minutes, followed by 30 minutes discussion)
  • Other (please let us know if you would like to do something different)

Submission instructions

Please email your 300 word abstract submission as a word document to Natacha Harding (natacha.harding@winchester.ac.uk). In addition, please state the full names of all authors, the title of the paper, which theme the abstract is being submitted for consideration, and also which institution/organisation you are from.

Key Dates:

  • 14 December 2017 – Call for papers opens and booking opens
  • 2 March 2018 – Call for papers closes
  • 30 March 2018 – All abstracts confirmed
  • 3 May 2018 – Symposium

Booking Instructions

See attached the completed call for papers, set up as an event on Eventbrite (https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/criminology-in-a-chaotic-world-british-society-of-criminology-lt-network-tickets-41274359721)

Please do contact Natacha Harding (natacha.harding@winchester.ac.uk) with any specific requirements in terms of access or dietary needs.

The University of Winchester is easily accessible by direct trains from London Waterloo and is well served by cross country services. Winchester has four Park & Ride services and is easily accessed from the M3. Please find more information here on getting to the University of Winchester.

Key Dates:

  • 14 December 2017 – Call for papers opens and booking opens
  • 2 March 2018 – Call for papers closes
  • 30 March 2018 – All abstracts confirmed
  • 3 May 2018 – Symposium

 

Two way street of student feedback Natacha Harding Natacha.Harding@winchester.ac.uk

Module and programmatic feedback. NSS. League Tables. Internal surveys preparing for all these. It seems that every other day, there is some form of student experience survey or feedback being gathered and requiring an action plan in response. Whatever your methodological or pedagogical views on such processes, they are an inherent part of modern higher education. Having recently taken over a leadership role within the programme I work in, I am starting to realise just how many of these surveys and assessments exist. I have, of course, written the action plans. The team I work with and I welcome student feedback and appreciate the constructive and positive role it can play. However, there is no escaping the one sided nature of this. We, of course, give feedback in both formal and informal situations to our students on their learning. However, what seems to be missing is the student buy in to the changes that we make on the basis of their feedback concerning their experience.

A classic example of this is interaction. Repeatedly, there are calls for more interactive elements in teaching sessions. I have attended the seminars telling me that the didactic information dump lecture is dead. Our students learn best by doing and being involved in their learning – a sense of ownership and responsibility in their development. However, I am sure we can all share stories of the silent seminar. Of the wonderfully designed, fully interactive, all round teaching session that then goes flat through the lack of participation. We, as educators, are battling back against years of rote teaching in the pre-18 year old education system where our students have generally been passive actors in their learning. How do we undo 14 years of education in a timely manner that ensures we get students to make the most of the whole three years they are with us for their degree?

I am trying something a little different this year which I am sure is by no means new in other institutions. I have so far written at least four different action plans and interim responses. As a team, we have made agreements about working practises and have communicated these to our students regarding what they can expect in terms of contact, teaching and assessment and many other areas. However, in turn, I have set out a response of what we expect from our students having acted on their feedback. If they are asking for more interaction then they need to interact more. If they want more assignment guidance, they need to take responsibility for following that guidance and acting upon it through an independent process of learning and assessment.

The two way ‘agreement’ is written in a positive and constructive tone. A sort of ‘you said, we did, now you do’ approach. I co-created it with a group of 10 students who, I will admit, were already the more engaged students in our cohorts but they did represent the three years of the programme and a range of attitudes to teaching and learning. They understood the nature of the educational process at degree level being less of the educator telling them what they needed to know and, through some form of osmosis, they learned and that it was more about it being a dialogue, a partnership. The nature of that partnership shifts and changes over time. At times, we need to be in the ‘teacher’ role and they need to be the ‘student’ (setting standards etc.). Sometimes, we are closer to being working partners (interactive ideas, dissertation supervision for example). The key to this ‘agreement’ is that it allows everyone to know what everyone can expect and that it is not a ‘stick’ to metaphorically beat anyone with. We already have a Student Charter (which all universities do) but this document goes beyond that. It is a statement of intent, an agreement that if we listen and act, students need to listen and act too. They are part of the process and there is responsibility on their part for their own learning and development.

I have no idea how this will go. I am going to be releasing the new agreement before Christmas. It will be a trial run. It may fall flat, it may be ignored. It may be a success. In a period of student as ‘consumer’, it may be an uphill battle to push some of the responsibility back to our ‘buyers’. However, I hope that even if it shifts a little towards students understanding their role in our response to their feedback, that is a win as far as I am concerned.